Neil Strauss Book: Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life

» 11 March 2009 » In Dope, Luxury, money, Style, Travel »

Neil Strauss Book: Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life

Click Here to Buy Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life By Neil Strauss

Click Here to Buy The 4-hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich by Tim Ferriss.

I haven’t read Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life yet, but I am going to buy it. Its basically about Multiple Passports, Swiss Banking, and Crossing Borders among other things.

The very timely book is by Neil Strauss, author of The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists. I heard about it from a few droogs and saw a post on Tim Ferriss’ Blog, the author of The 4-hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich.

Here is an excerpt from Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life:

Lesson 22 – The Gone With the Wind Guide to Asset Protection

If you wanted to withdraw your entire life savings and move it to a bank in Switzerland, what would you do?

Now that I’d decided to hide my assets offshore, the information from the Sovereign Society conference about the government tracking withdrawals and transfers of more than $10,000 applied to me. It seemed impossible to get the money from my American bank to the Swiss bank Spencer recommended without ringing alarm bells. Even if I moved it in small increments, there would still be a paper trail detailing exactly how much money I’d transferred.

So I did what any resourceful American would do: I bought a book on money laundering.

After all, it isn’t a crime to move money secretly as long as the income’s been reported to the IRS and any other necessary reporting requirements are met. And my intention wasn’t to hide my earnings from the government, customs, or creditors, but to protect it from bank collapses, inflation, seizure, and lawsuits, which required leaving few traces of where it went.

Securing money overseas is not a new idea. Even in the novel Gone With the Wind, Rhett butler keeps his earnings in offshore banks, enabling him to buy a house for Scarlett o’Hara after the Civil War—in contrast to his Southern colleagues, who lose their fortunes due to blockades, inflation, and financial collapse.

For more practical, non-fictional inspiration, I bought Jeffrey Robinson’s 1996 book The Laundrymen. I’d always wondered how empty video stores renting movies for $3 a day could stay in business, and why I’d see Russian thugs running clearly unprofitable frozen yogurt stands on deserted side streets. According to Robinson, it’s because, in order to make illegal funds appear legitimate, crooks will slowly feed the money into the cash registers of a normal business.

Click Here to Buy Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life By Neil Strauss

Click Here to Buy The 4-hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich by Tim Ferriss.

“It’s almost impossible to spot an extra $500 coming in daily through the tills of a storefront stocked with 15,000 videos,” he writes. “Nor would anyone’s suspicions necessarily be raised if that same owner ran a chain of twenty video rental stores and, backed up with the appropriate audits, awarded himself an annual bonus of $3.96 million.”

Buried elsewhere in Robinson’s book was the answer I was looking for. The best legal way to surreptitiously move money, it seems, is to buy something that doesn’t lose its cash value when purchased. For example, there’s a black market for people who transfer money by buying expensive jewelry, art, watches, and collectibles, then selling them in their destination country for a small loss—usually no greater than the percentage banks charge for exchanging currencies.

So once AIG private bank in Switzerland returned my phone call—assuming that, unlike Spencer’s [a billionaire who appears earlier in the book] lawyer, they were actually willing to work with me—I planned to go shopping for rare coins.

But if it was all so legitimate, why did it feel so wrong?

While I waited to hear from the Swiss bank, I drove to Burbank to meet with the asset protection lawyers Spencer had recommended, Tarasov and Associates. The receptionist led me into a room with black-and-silver wallpaper where Alex Tarasov sat at a large mahogany desk with a yellow legal pad in front of him. With this pad, he would rearrange my business life forever.

“You did a very smart thing by coming here,” Tarasov said. Twenty- five years ago, he had probably been a frat boy. Maybe even played varsity football. But a quarter century spent sitting at desks scrutinizing legal papers had removed all evidence of health from his skin and physique. “By taking everything you own out of your name, we can hide it from lawyers trying to do an asset search on you.”

“So if they sue me and win, they won’t be able to get anything?”

“We can make it very difficult for them to find the things you own and get at them. It’s not impossible, but the deeper we bury your assets, the more money it’s going to cost to find out where they are. And if we can make that time and cost greater than the worth of the assets, then you’re in good shape.”

Like Spencer had said, this was just insurance. The cost of setting this up would be like taking out a policy against lawsuits.

“So what do you own?” he asked.

I laid it all out for him. “I have a house I’m still paying for. I have some stocks and bonds my grandparents gave me when I was a kid. I have a checking and a savings account. And I have the copyrights to my books.” I paused, trying to remember if I owned anything else. I thought there was more. “I guess that’s about it. I have a secondhand Dodge Durango, I guess. And a 1972 corvette that doesn’t work.”

In truth, I didn’t own that much. But ever since my first college job, standing over a greasy grill making omelets and grilled cheese sandwiches, I had started putting money in the bank. Since then, I’d saved enough to live on for a year or two if I ever fell on hard times or just wanted to see the world. I didn’t want to lose the freedom that came from having a financial cushion and not being in debt for anything besides my house.

“Here’s what we can do,” Tarasov said. He then sketched this diagram on his legal pad:

The stick figure was me. as for the boxes, I had no idea what those were. “These are boxes,” Tarasov explained. I was clearly getting the asset-protection-for-dummies lecture. “Each box represents a different LLC”—limited liability company. “If we can wrap everything in an LLC, and then all those LLCs are owned by a holding company, and that holding company is owned by a trust that you don’t even technically own, then you’re safe.”

I liked that last word. But I didn’t understand the rest of it.

“So we’re just basically making everything really complicated?” I asked.

“That’s the idea. We’ll even put your house in a separate LLC, so that if someone trips and falls, they can’t get at anything else you own.”

When Tarasov was through explaining everything, I couldn’t tell whether I was protecting myself from being scammed or actually being scammed myself. But I trusted Spencer, because he seemed too rich, too smart, and too paranoid to get taken in. So I told Tarasov to start wrapping me up in LLCs until my net-worth was whatever spending money I had in my pocket.

“Once we have these entities set up, we can talk about transferring them to offshore corporations,” Tarasov said as I left.

Source

I already got the multiple passports, but I am sure I can learn a thing or two from this book.

You can too.

Click Here to Buy Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life By Neil Strauss

Click Here to Buy The 4-hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich by Tim Ferriss.

The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

Krayzie Bone- Thug Mentality

Tags: , , , ,

Trackback URL

2 Comments on "Neil Strauss Book: Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life"

  1. The G Manifesto
    alphadominance
    12/03/2009 at 12:06 am Permalink

    It’s not for nothing that corporations go multinational. Individuals too can only gain by emancipating themselves from the claims of a specific nationality. Best of all is if you can take your income stream out of the country and incorporate in a tax haven like the Cayman Islands. Doesn’t hurt to have a stash of cash in each of the major national currencies either. If one goes down relative to another you retain greater purchasing power than if all is held in the depreciating currency . Presently the only thing propping up the greenback is that we are the reserve currency for the world. This is an opportune time to buy other currencies. With the inflationary spending we are engaging in as a nation, the Chinese are likely to begin dumping treasuries which will light a conflagration of inflation for the dollar. If you have cash seriously consider depatriating some of it.

  2. The G Manifesto
    Chris McCann
    14/03/2009 at 11:56 pm Permalink

    If anyone is interested in getting this book I just finished it and wrote up a review on it http://tinyurl.com/bnshcf

Hi Stranger, leave a comment:

ALLOWED XHTML TAGS:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Subscribe to Comments