Tag Archive > Muhammad Ali

The Last Round: Muhammad Ali VS George Chuvalo Documentary

» 08 April 2012 » In Boxing, People » 1 Comment

The Last Round: Muhammad Ali VS George Chuvalo Documentary

This is a great documentary of a bygone era.

It is kind of interesting how they were talking about boxing being “in trouble” back then.

Chuvalo is a grade A tough guy. Pure G.

G Manifesto Hall of Fame member as well.

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Chuvalo was rough, tough and very strong; He had a “cast iron” chin, similar to that of the great Jim Jeffries; He fought the hardest of punchers – George Foreman, Joe Frazier, Cleveland Williams, Oscar “Ringo” Bonavena, Yvon Durelle – and was never knocked down; During his career, he won the Heavyweight Championship of Canada

George was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1997

GEORGE CHUVALO

Interview conducted by Barry Lindenman

BL: You come from Canada which is known for turning out tough, rugged hockey players. You were known as a tough and rugged boxer. How did you get involved in the sport of boxing when it appears from your boxing style that you would have made a great hockey player as well?

GC: You think I fight like a hockey player (laughing)? You think all Canadians are tough? I thought they were mostly “stick and move” guys (laughing). As a kid, I remember when I first opened up a Ring magazine. It was the first time I’d ever seen anything about boxing, heard anything about boxing or even knowing about boxing. For me it was like when a kid opens up the centerfold of Playboy. To me, it was like “wow, this is it!” I thought it was like the greatest thing in the world. I saw pictures of guys with all these muscles throwing punches shots at each other. I guess it was the respect for power that really turned me on to boxing as a young man.

BL: Did you have a certain boxing role model that you patterned your style after?

GC: No, not really. There was a lot of guys I liked but I don’t think I ever tried to fight like this guy or that guy. I grew up watching Joe Louis, Willie Pep and Ray Robinson. As a kid when I first started to box, those guys were champions of the world so they’ll always mean something a little more special to me than a lot of the other guys. You’re looking at me through American eyes. To me, I’m just a fighter, you know what I mean? I don’t think I had a Canadian style or an American style. My style was just mine, just walk in and pitch.

BL: You will always be remembered as a long time heavyweight contender who fought the best, took their best shots and was never knocked off his feet either as a pro or an amateur. Are you satisfied with your reputation and how you’re remembered as a boxer?

GC: First of all, it depends who’s trying to remember me. Certain guys may think of me in a certain way and other guys may think of me in another way. Most people think I was a tough guy who took a good rap. I think I was a lot better defensive fighter than I was ever given credit for. I’ll go down in history as a supposed tough guy who fought a lot of tough guys, beat a lot of tough guys, lost to some tough guys. I was there. I was a contender for almost a couple of decades and knocked on the door a few times, but am I satisfied, hell no! If you’ve never been champion of the world you can’t be satisfied. I guess I can say I’m proud of my achievements. I’m happy with some of the things I’ve done. I did OK. A fighter always thinks he coulda done better than he did. There’s always a gnawing kind of feeling that I wish I could have been champion of the world. There’s a piece of me that always feels kinda incomplete. All in all, I did a lot better in life than most guys. I was ranked number two in the world at one time. Not too many guys can say they were number two in the world, except Hertz, me and Hertz (laughing)!

BL: Having faced such great fighters such as Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, who would you say was the hardest puncher you ever faced in the ring?

GC: It was neither of those guys. Mike Dejohn was a real good wacker. Mike Dejohn knocked out a lot of guys in one round. Mike Dejohn was a good banger. Foreman was a good banger too, of course. Mel Turnbaugh was also. I guess they were about the three hardest punchers: George Foreman, Mel Turnbaugh and Mike Dejohn.

BL: During your great career, you fought Muhammad Ali twice and went the distance with him both times. You first fought him in 1966 just before his three year exile from the sport and then again in 1972 soon after his return to the ring. What differences did you notice in Ali in the two times that you fought him and did you alter your strategy between the first and second fights?

GC: You got it wrong. Ali went the distance with me both times (laughing). I threw more head punches in the second fight. In the first fight, I concentrated on maybe 75 – 80 % to the body.

I kinda switched it the other way around in the second fight. I fought a smarter fight the second time. I hit him with a lot of jabs in the second fight. Nobody ever talks about that but if you look at the film, you’ll notice I hit him with a lot of jabs. But I still think I should have worked the body more than I did. I worked the body too much in the first fight and not enough in the second fight. The second fight was still a very close, hard fought fight. Some sportswriters even thought I won the second fight. How was Ali different? He was just more energetic in the first fight. He threw more punches and had more verve in a sense. He was trying to get by in the second fight with a lot of guile. He didn’t have the same physical attributes as he had in the first fight. He had flashes of it but he couldn’t sustain it like he could in the first fight. In the first fight, he was a much better conditioned athlete. After his exile, he never really came back. He never came back to the fighter he was before he was put into exile. He was never that fighter ever, ever, ever again. Even though he fought some great fights after with Joe Frazier for instance, he was never the same fighter. When he beat George Foreman he beat him by using his brains. He sucked him in with the “rope – a – dope.” He didn’t beat him on physical ability as much as a well planned fight plan. He used his intelligence and general boxing savvy and let Foreman punch himself out. Then he just took over. But he was not the same athlete ever again.

BL: Ali was famous for giving his opponents nicknames. Sonny Liston was the Bear, Joe Frazier was the Gorilla. He nicknamed you the “Washer Woman.” Do you know what he meant by that?

GC: In September of 1963, I beat Mike Dejohn, knocked him colder than Missouri mule. I knocked him out with a left hook and pummeled him over the ropes. It didn’t occur to me until twenty five years later in 1988 why he called me the “Washer Woman.” It was because in the fight with Dejohn, I had his back draped way over the ropes and I already had him knocked out. I had him pinned against the ropes and I started pummeling him, just beating on a knocked out guy. It looked like I was working on a scrub board. That’s why he called me the “Washer Woman.” It sounds uncomplimentary but it really wasn’t. Ali said George Chuvalo fights rough and tough like a “Washer Woman.” It was a kind of a cute term.

BL: Although you never won a world title during your career, what would you say was your greatest moment in your boxing career?

GC: There’s a few of them. I knocked out Doug Jones, something that Ali couldn’t do. In fact, a lot of people thought he actually beat Ali. I knocked out Jerry Quarry when a lot of people thought I would lose to Quarry. I knocked him out with a second to go in the seventh round. After the Frazier fight, my eyes had a propensity to swell up very rapidly so in the fight with Quarry, I fought like a one eyed cat peeping in a seafood store for about four rounds. The referee told me if the eye gets any worse he was gonna stop the fight so if I didn’t knock him out when I did, they would have stopped the fight. I also knocked out Manuel Ramos in five rounds. He was the Mexican champion who’d beaten Ernie Terrell and a few other guys and had Frazier down before Frazier eventually stopped him.

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He fought everyone and anyone who meant anything in the heavyweight division in the 50’s, 60s and 70’s. No one ever knocked him down, and only Joe Frazier and George Foreman were able to stop the man who Muhammad Ali called “The Washer Woman.” Make no mistake; George Chuvalo was no washer woman. In fact he was without question the toughest of the tough; the most rugged of the top men of his day.

He faced, in a career that spanned 22 years, the aforementioned Ali, Frazier, and Foreman, plus Floyd Patterson, Jerry Quarry, Doug Jones, Cleveland Williams, Brian London, Jimmy Ellis, Ernie Terrell, Zora Folley, Mike DeJohn, Robert Cleroux, Manuel Ramos, and Oscar Bonavena. Even before he was experienced enough he was put in with ranked contenders, Howard King, Big Bob Baker, Julio Mederos, and Alex Miteff. George turned pro in 1956 winning four fights by quick KOs in one night.

This all begs the question; how is it possible that Chuvalo looks (okay, his nose is a little mushy) and sounds as though he never stepped into the ring let alone absorbed the punches of the toughest men in the world? Just ask Chuvalo for an answer to that. He has a theory that appears to have validity.

“Some guys are built for speed,” explained the former Canadian heavyweight boss. “Some guys are built for power. Your body type dictates your style, I was a walk in pitcher, and I didn’t move too much. I wanted to walk in and slug it out. I can tell you the guy who won’t take a good shot; the guy with the small head and a neck like a stack of dimes.”

He explained that fighters who had bigger heads and short powerful necks were better equipped to take a hard punch than a guy with a skinny neck and a narrow or small head. He mentioned a few examples of fighters who have had that innate ability to take punches and that list included Jake LaMotta, Tex Cobb, and himself.

“And even Ali,” he added. “He took a pretty good rap, even though he’d been down a few times.”

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The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

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Muhammad Ali: On Why Wealth is Important

» 25 February 2012 » In Boxing, People, Style » 3 Comments

Muhammad Ali: On Why Wealth is Important

Listen:

Side note:

The picture above was taken at the original The 5th St. Gym, Miami Beach.

Here is a little article on The re-opened 5th Street Gym:

Through a slumping economy and a rapidly changing boxing landscape, the owners have established 5th Street Gym as a landmark in its own right.

The secret, Baiamonte said, is in the spirit.

“A lot of gyms are so money-hungry, that all they care about is, ‘OK, this is what you have to pay, and that’s it,’ ’’ Baiamonte said. “Here, we won’t do that. Here, it’s just being friendly. That’s the one thing Angelo always did: He was friendly with everybody.”

Baiamonte is one of several “Dundee disciples,” a group of trainers who honed their craft under the late Angelo Dundee. A self-described gym rat, Baiamonte began working with Dundee in 2000, and in 2009 he decided he wanted to reopen the 5th Street Gym. As he looked into different options, he joined forces with the Chicago duo of Spencer — also a trainer — and Tsatas —a businessman and boxing enthusiast.

All that’s left of the original location is a plaque, and so Baiamonte, Spencer and Tsatas bought a space one block north, at 555 Washington Ave.

Now, the 5th Street Gym’s legacy is displayed on the walls of the new location with fight posters dating to Muhammad Ali’s storied 1964 upset victory over Sonny Liston. Baiamonte even brought in a window from the original gym and the sign that welcomed visitors from 5th Street.

Still, the owners know they’ve got to pave a legacy of their own.

“Don’t try to copy,” Dundee told the trio. “You’ve got to create.”

Read more here:

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The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

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How To Wear A Pocket Square

» 12 January 2012 » In Guide, People, Style » 4 Comments

How To Wear A Pocket Square

First off, the wrong way to wear a pocket square is to not wear a pocket square, like these two bozos below. Politicians are historically speaking, horrible dressers.

Here is one of the exceptions to the “politicians” dressing horribly rule. Willie Brown always dresses smooth. Whenever I am in San Francisco, I always stop by his base of operations for menswear, Wilkes Bashford.

Cary Grant always dresses smooth. Check out To Catch a Thief. Cary Grant and I share some of the same Style lineage. I may elaborate more in the future.

Not sure I dig the way Tony Montana rocks the pocket square. I actually used to rock it this way but haven’t for years.

Muhammad Ali, cold chilling. Smooth Square. Relaxation.

Bruce Lee rocks the pocket square perfect. Straight across. Matching with the tie can pretty dope, as witnessed here, but far from necessary.

Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra always rock the pocket squares on point. Smoking is a nice Style touch as well.

Las Vegas visionary and all around super G, Bugsy Siegel knows how to rock the square. I have mentioned before that I have the same “large houndstooth check” jacket. I had to have it Custom Made, of course.

James Bond always rocks the square right. Real subtle and dope.

Chain smoker, International Playboy and Boxing Champ Mickey Walker wears the square with ease. So does Doc Kerns.

Sean Connery shows you how to relax: pocket square, feet up and with a smoke.

Serge Gainsbourg can rock the square.

Hollywood Playboy Warren Beaty rocks the square while playing Bugsy Siegel. Good casting job.

Super G Robert Shaw rocks the power square. Presence. And I don’t mean that Led Zeppelin album either. Or maybe I do.

Hollywood tough guy Humphrey Bogart busts a decent square.

Marcello Mastroianni rocks the gun, the flower and the square. Watch La Dolce Vita.

photo credits

One of Football’s true G’s and Playboys, Joe Namath rocks the square hard.

Dance G, Fred Astaire is crispy and clean.

Spanish Artist Super G, Salvador Dali rocks the square like melting watches. He had a dope crib in Cadaques as well. Great style.

Spanish Artist Pablo Picasso was a true Playboy. And does a halfway decent job of rocking the square.

Chicago legend Al Capone always rocked the square.

JFK always dressed dope. Back when Presidents were good, and enjoyed life. And a smoke.

If you don’t know, now you know.

Click Here for a grip of Pocket Squares

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The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

Jane Birkin et Serge Gainsbourg – Je T’aime,…Moi Non Plus

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The Greatest Muhammad Ali on Youtube and Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

» 26 December 2010 » In Boxing, G Manifesto, People » No Comments

The Greatest Muhammad Ali on Youtube and Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

Click Here for Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

Thanks to reader Matt for letting me know that Muhammad Ali – The Greatest is on Youtube:

In other boxing news:

Click Here for Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

Gangs of Madison Square Garden

At the end of the 19th century, the bluebloods took over the bare-knuckle prize ring, put gloves on the contestants and laid claim to the fights. It was the best and worst thing that had ever happened to boxing: Now civilized, the sport grew in popularity but compromised its savage soul. In the 1950s, televisions arrived in American living rooms and fans tuned in to watch the Friday-night fights. It was the best and worst thing that had ever happened to the sport: Though immensely profitable, boxing lost a primal connection with its most avid fans, the spectators in the arena.

Between these eras, during the so-called golden years, the best and worst thing that happened to boxing was the mob.

This was a period in which a fighter had to be “connected” to compete in the fights at Madison Square Garden—the fights that mattered. The mobsters—Frankie Carbo, Frank Costello, “Blinky” Palermo, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel and countless figures associated with the Genovese, Lucchese and Gotti crime families— controlled every aspect of boxing management and promotion, the fights and fighters. Yet the same era spawned such champions as “Cinderella Man” James J. Braddock, Joe Louis, Rocky Marciano and the self-proclaimed “Greatest of All Time,” Muhammad Ali.

Click Here for Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

Kevin Mitchell, the chief sports writer for the London Observer, unravels the helix of the mafia and the fight game in “Jacobs Beach,” his second book on the sweet science. (“Jacobs Beach” was a nickname for the corner of Broadway and Eighth Ave. in Manhattan, where fight fans would crowd for tickets at the offices of promoter Mike Jacobs.) Less about the sport than about the business intrigue surrounding it, Mr. Mitchell’s account brings to life the fight world of that era, often drawing on his own interviews with athletes and notables, such as writer Budd Schulberg, boxer Joe Miceli and trainer Lou Duva.

Source

Thanks to Le Parvenue for putting me up on this.

Click Here for Jacobs Beach: The Mob, the Fights, the Fifties

The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

Method Man, Ghostface, Raekwon – Our Dreams

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5th St. Gym, Miami Beach

» 07 December 2010 » In Boxing, G Manifesto, Guide, People, Style, Travel » 3 Comments

5th St. Gym, Miami Beach

Click Here for Muhammad Ali: Recipe for Life

Click Here for The South Beach War Report Part I: The Basics

I have mentioned before that The Legendary 5th Street Gym in Miami Beach has recently re-opened and I plan to be there soon. My father, Michael John Mason VI, used to take me there as a young pup and that was where I first met Muhammad Ali (among others). I can’t wait to go back. It’s already locked in stone on my schedule. Congratulations to Angelo Dundee, Dr. Ferdie Pacheco, Tom Tsatas, Matt Baiamonte and Dino Spencer for making it happen. This is a huge one in the win column and a true sign that The Apocalypse is Not coming. At least not yet anyway.

The History of 5th St. Gym, Miami Beach

Muhammed Ali:5th Street Gym

The Fight Years (documentary trailer) 5th Street Gym

Click Here for Muhammad Ali: Recipe for Life

Click Here for The South Beach War Report Part I: The Basics

Know your G history.

The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

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Muhammad Ali: Recipe for Life

» 24 June 2010 » In Boxing, People, Style » 2 Comments

Muhammad Ali: Recipe for Life

Q: What would you like people to think about you when your gone?

Muhammad Ali: He took a few cups of love. He took one table spoon of patience. One table spoon, tea-spoon of generosity. He took a few cups of love. He took one table spoon of patience. One table spoon, tea-spoon of generosity. One pint of kindness. He took one quart of laughter. One pinch of concern. And then he mixed willingness with happiness. He added lots of faith. And he stirred it up well. Then he spread it over a span of a lifetime. And he served it to each and every deserving person he met.

Smooth. Couldn’t have said it better myself.

A little over 47 years ago to the day, Muhammad Ali got off the canvas to wax England’s Henry Cooper. In his next fight, he would defeat Sonny Liston for The World Heavyweight Title in Ring Magazine’s 1964 Fight of the Year. Boxing, and the World, would never be the same.

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The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

Ali Rap

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Muhammad Ali visits Irish Roots

» 01 September 2009 » In Boxing, People » 1 Comment

Muhammad Ali visits Irish Roots

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Bang: More Lays In 60 Days

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Boxing legend Muhammad Ali made a sentimental journey Tuesday to discover his Irish roots, and met distant relatives during celebrations at the local town hall and a nearby castle.

Thousands lined the streets of Ennis, western Ireland, to cheer the motorcade carrying Ali as the three-time world heavyweight champion visited the home of his great-grandfather Abe Grady.

Fans adorned streets with red, white and blue USA bunting and flags, while shop windows competed to display the most impressive posters honoring Ali — including one tongue-in-cheek portrait of him appearing ready to knock out an unpopular Irish politician.

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Ali, who is 67 and battling Parkinson’s disease, offered a few playful jabs to cameras but made no public comments and steered clear of throngs of autograph-seekers, among them hundreds of kids whose schools closed early for the event. Police blocked off roads and kept crowds in line with railings.

Ali Rap

Grady settled in Kentucky in the 1860s and married a freed slave. One of their grandchildren, Odessa Lee Grady Clay, gave birth to Ali — then Cassius Clay — in 1942.

Genealogists pinpointed Ali’s Irish links in 2002, but Ali had never visited Ennis before.

His visit to Ennis Town Hall was broadcast live on big-screen televisions outside, where locals also took in a live concert by Irish traditional musicians, including best-selling accordionist Sharon Shannon.

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Ali’s wife, Yolanda, said her husband’s Irish blood might help explain his legendary ability to bludgeon his opponents with blarney as well as punches. She stayed close at Ali’s side throughout the public events, talking to him and steadying him as they walked arm in arm.

When you look at Muhammad’s pugilistic skills and his loquacious ways, I am sure if his great-grandfather was alive, he would swear it came from him. If he were alive today I bet he would be in every pub talking about it too,” she said.

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Many people call Muhammad Ali the “first Rapper”.

My Irish Grandfather was always smooth with the poetry.

Good to know Hip-Hop has a little Irish in it.

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The Rest is Up to You…

Michael Porfirio Mason
AKA The Peoples Champ
AKA GFK, Jr.
AKA The Sly, Slick and the Wicked
AKA The Voodoo Child
The Guide to Getting More out of Life

http://www.thegmanifesto.com

Get Used To Me – Ali Rap Music Video featuring Chuck D

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